Friday, 11 June 2010

God or a god

In one of the topics on our sistergroup Tigger2 spoke about the use of theos and Elohim in the gospel writings of John.

John
used elohim in a few scriptures to mean "a god" in its positive, subordinate, secondary sense, while he applies the title theos directly to Jesus.

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John 10:33 The word [theos] in the NEB it reads on the basis of the Greek text:
" 'We are not going to stone you for any good deed, but for your blasphemy. You, a mere man, claim to be a god.'  Jesus answered, 'Is it not written in your own Law, "I said: You are gods"?  Those are called gods to whom the word of God was delivered - and Scripture cannot be set aside.  Then why do you charge me with blasphemy because I, consecrated and sent into the world by the Father, said, "I am God's SON"?'"
Not only do we see John using theos in its positive alternate meaning here, but we also see Jesus clarifying it.  When some of the Jews were ready to stone him because they said he was claiming to be a god (Jesus’ reply about men being called gods in the scriptures would have been nonsensical if he were replying to an accusation of being God), Jesus first pointed out that God himself had called judges of Israel gods (Ps. 82:6)!
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Read
Tigger2 his discourse in God or a god and please do find more on this subject in:

God of gods
God is one

In Dutch / In het Nederlands kan u een nota vinden over wat Tigger2 opmerkt betreft Johannes zijn gebruik van theos en elohim in zijn geschriften > God of een god

Lees ook meer hierover in:

God versus goden
Is god drie-eenheid
Geloof in slechts één god